Fatal Accident

Mrs. Sarah C. Abraham Killed

On Sunday morning about 11 o’clock, Mrs. Abraham was driving in town from the ___ on Washington Street. She was driving a three year-old colt attached to a two-wheeled cart. At or near the southeast corner of the square, the horse became frightened and started to run. Mrs. Abraham was a strong, self-possessed, resolute woman and those who were present said that she seemed just before the accident to have almost regained control of the frightened horse. For a moment she may may have lost her balance, and in that moment lost control, as the horse, when near the railing, quickly turned, throwing her forward out of the cart, she striking the ground with great force on her head.

The east side of the public square in Mt. Pleasant, (ca. 1865) looking toward the southeast. The "railing" mentioned in the obituary refers to the hitching rail that surrounded the park's perimeter seen in the foreground. The Ambler Building (tall structure in photograph) had burned prior to Neal's fatal accident in 1888.

The east side of the public square in Mt. Pleasant, (ca. 1865) looking toward the southeast. The “railing” mentioned in the obituary refers to the hitching rail that surrounded the park’s perimeter seen in the foreground. The Ambler Building (tall structure in photograph) had burned prior to Neal’s fatal accident in 1888.

She was picked up unconscious and conveyed to the residence of Dr. [Alfred Orpheus] Pitcher ¹ who was at her side immediately after the accident. About fifteen minutes after the accident, she was dead. She died without recovering consciousness. An examination showed no severe bruises upon the body except just below the neck and the back and front part of the head. A little finger was dislocated and a small pebble stone was imbedded under the skin of the forehead. It was a great shock to the people of this city, and crowds of weeping friends were soon gathered around. Before her death, a messenger was hastily dispatched for her husband, Hon. Lot Abraham and her daughter, at home. The bereaved friends have the universal sympathy of all. The funeral was held from her late residence southeast of town on Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock. Rev. Dr. [Thomas E.] Corkhill and Rev. Mr. Richards officiating. It was largely attended by sympathizing friends and relatives.

Mrs. Abraham was about forty-seven years old at the time of her death, really in the prime of life, active in every good work, universally esteemed and respected, having a brilliant mind, a generals, charitable disposition. She was prominent in many public gatherings and will be sadly missed from a large circle of friends. She was united in marriage to Captain Lot Abraham, September 13th, 1865, very soon after he was mustered out of the service. She leaves four children, John G. and Sallie, students at Ames Agricultural College, Mary and Katie. She has one brother, who, since her death, is now the only remaining member of her father’s family — John B. Alden, the celebrated book publisher at New York City. On her father’s side, she is a direct descendant of the celebrated John Alden who came over from England in the Mayflower in 1620, and who was immortalized by Longfellow in his celebrated poem, “The courtship of Miles Standish.” On her mother’s side, her grandfather was a well known pioneer and minister.

¹ Dr. Alfred Orpheus Pitcher (1843-1915)  was the son of Dr. Festus C. Pitcher (1822-1872) and Mariah Fleming (1822-1893).

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